Preparing for Your Upcoming Stack Test

Source Emissions testing, or stack testing, is mandated by the Clean Air Act of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which sets forth guidelines and requirements that must be met to determine a facility’s compliance with emission limits.  Any and all plants, factories, and facilities that utilize a stack as part of manufacturing or production operations are required to undergo stack testing in order to demonstrate compliance with current EPA standards.  There is more to stack testing than simple compliance, however.  A properly-executed testing plan gives you the diagnostic tools to help optimize your operations and improve energy efficiency — quality incentives for voluntary stack testing that is not simply driven by EPA requirements.  With careful preparation for stack-testing compliance and the proper execution of the test plan, a company can save money, protect workers, and effectively streamline their operations.

As a company prepares their facility for an upcoming stack test, reviewing the state-approved test plan is the best way to ensure that you understand all of the testing requirements.  Doing so is your greatest insurance that the stack testing results will show proper compliance with all relevant EPA air emission standards.  However, in many cases technical or legal jargon may make a portion or the entirety of the test plan difficult to understand, and it may not contain all of the required information necessary to conduct a successful test.  To assist you with this, we have put together the following Stack Testing Preparation Checklist to help you make sure that your company is properly prepared for your upcoming testing.  All items on this checklist should be reviewed with your qualified stack-testing team.

  1. What Load you will test at – This information is typically in your air permit, and/or determined by applicable federal/state  regulations.
  2. What Fuel you will burn – Different fuel types can have vastly different emission limits
  3. OSHA compliant platforms – How will the stack test team reach the sampling plane?
  4. Power Requirements – Do you have enough circuits?
  5. Safety/Insurance Concerns- What are your facility requirements?  Does your stack test company meet these requirements?
  6. Are your Test Ports free from blockage and EPA Method 1 Compliant?
  7. What Process Data are you required to document, and how will that data be logged?

Here at Environmental Source Samplers Inc., we’re familiar with the pitfalls a company can experience when faced with an upcoming test.  Advance preparation, with these guidelines in mind, will provide your company the ability to address any issues or questions prior to the stack testing date. Saving your company the time, hassle, and money that late revisions and changes inevitably cause.  These guidelines are also helpful in maintaining high levels of safety and compliance regardless of having a scheduled stack test or not, benefitting the overall operations and their environmental impact.

Choosing a stack testing company that has the appropriate background and experience for your industry will help ensure that your stack test will be successful.  The stack testing company should have the capability to execute the testing types and methodologies that govern your specific operations, while using equipment that is well-maintained and up-to-date.  Just as importantly, they should be current and informed on the changes and revisions to existing testing methodologies, since the EPA air emission limits and standards are subject to change as the Agency sees fit.

Stack testing is required and performed for the health and safety of the plant, the workers, and the environment.   It is also a diagnostic tool that provides insight into the efficiency of your operations.  However, whether you are testing for compliance or diagnostic purposes, careful preparation is the key to ensuring that your stack testing project gives you the data that you can use effectively.

Please contact the experts at Environmental Source Samplers (ESS) to learn more about their stack testing services:

Phone: 910-799-1055
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.ESSKnowsAir.com

EPA News: EPA Names First Chemicals for Review Under New TSCA Legislation

EPA News: 10 Chemicals Under TSCA Review

WASHINGTON – Today, EPA is announcing the first ten chemicals it will evaluate for potential risks to human health and the environment under TSCA reform.

“Under the new law, we now have the power to require safety reviews of all chemicals in the marketplace.” said Jim Jones, assistant administrator of the of Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention. “We can ensure the public that we will deliver on the promise to better protect public health and the environment.”

The first ten chemicals to be evaluated are:

  • 1,4-Dioxane
  • 1-Bromopropane
  • Asbestos
  • Carbon Tetrachloride
  • Cyclic Aliphatic Bromide Cluster
  • Methylene Chloride
  • N-methylpyrrolidone
  • Pigment Violet 29
  • Tetrachloroethylene, also known as perchloroethylene
  • Trichloroethylene

Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) as amended by the Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act, requires EPA to publish this list by December 19, 2016. These chemicals were drawn from EPA’s 2014 TSCA Work Plan, a list of 90 chemicals selected based on their potential for high hazard and exposure as well as other considerations.

When the list is published in the Federal Register it will trigger a statutory deadline to complete risk evaluations for these chemicals within three years.  This evaluation will determine whether the chemicals present an unreasonable risk to humans and the environment. If it is determined that a chemical presents an unreasonable risk, EPA must mitigate that risk within two years.

Under the newly amended law, EPA must release a scoping document within six months for each chemical. This will include the hazard(s), exposure(s), conditions of use, and the potentially exposed or susceptible subpopulation(s) the agency plans to consider for the evaluation.

Additional chemicals will be designated for evaluation, and all of the remaining Work Plan chemicals will be reviewed for their potential hazard and exposure. For each risk evaluation that EPA completes, TSCA requires that EPA begin another. By the end of 2019, EPA must have at least 20 chemical risk valuations ongoing at any given time.

For more on the chemicals listed and additional information: https://www.epa.gov/assessing-and-managing-chemicals-under-tsca/evaluating-risk-existing-chemicals-under-tsca

###

EPA MEDIA CONTACT:

Cathy Mibourn

[email protected]

(202)-564-7849

 

Supreme Court Halts MATS Rule

Late Tuesday it was announced that the U.S. Supreme Court has halted the implementation of the Mercury and Air Toxics (MATS) rule.  This is the first time in recent memory that the U.S. Supreme Court has put a rule on hold before the lower court review.  Rulings from the lower court are expected over the summer.

Here are some other articles discussing the Supreme Court’s decision to put the MATS rule on hold:

Supreme Court To EPA: Fool Me Once

Carbon pollution controls put on hold

Supreme Court Puts White House’s Carbon Pollution Limits On Hold

 

Stack Testing Compliance Controls Air Emissions and Maintains Air Quality

Stack Testing for Air Quality ControlStack testing for any industry that utilizes a tower for production is a necessary component of the facility operation.  Compliance with Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations on stack testing and air emissions is necessary in order to avoid violations and penalties as well as to aid in the management of environmental health and air quality as put forth in the Clean Air Act, originally enacted in 1970 and improved by amendments over the last forty years.

The EPA states that consistent, complete, and accurate stack test information is critical in managing the national air program.  Stack testing is conducted for purposes of performing routine source maintenance, relative accuracy test audits (RATA tests), linearity checks, and routine calibration of continuous emission monitoring systems (CEMS Testing).  All of these performance tests ultimately help determine compliance with applicable regional, state, or national EPA standards using approved test methodologies.

Stack testing protocols vary according to industry, process, facility, and permit requirements.  Some of the different protocols available for testing emission units include:

  • Manual Emissions Testing – includes EPA test methods and NIOSH/OSHA methods as well as ASTM, CARB, and SW846 test methods.
  • Instrumental Emission Testing – includes CEMS Testing, Performance Specification Testing, CO/CO2/O2/SO2/NOx, and Total Gaseous Organics.
  • Special Emissions Testing – can include Capture Efficiency (CE) determinations, VOC emissions profiling, Thermal Oxidizer Temperatire Optimization, and Mercury speciation determination.
  • Air Pollution Control Equipment Testing and Optimization – facilities can expect on-site inspection, equipment specification data, diagnostic testing, performance data evaluation, adn pilot plant tests.

While environmental regulations seem to be ever-changing, stack testing equipment and technology must keep pace with industry developments affecting air quality.  Environmental consulting firms and stack testing agencies are challenged to remain on the cusp of new and revamped air quality regulations.  Routine testing and maintenance programs help compliance efforts as well as reliance on a qualified and reputable stack testing company.

Please contact the experts at Environmental Source Samplers (ESS) to learn more about our stack testing services:

Phone: 910-799-1055
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.ESSKnowsAir.com

12 Things to Look for in a Stack Testing Company

Stack Testing SpecialistStack testing companies specialize in air emissions testing for compliance with standards and test methodologies set out by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).  Manufacturing and processing industries such as Pulp and Paper, Cement, Pharmaceutical, and Petrochemical, use a large variety of air emissions sources — like baghouses, boilers, engines, heaters, incinerators, lime kilns, regenerative thermal oxidizers, turbines, and many more — all of which require testing for air quality compliance.

While these industries must comply with the government standards for air testing, they do have options when it comes to choosing a stack testing company.  There are many factors to consider when choosing a stack testing company, and we’ve set out to bring you the Top 12 Things To Look For in a Stack Testing Company.

  1. QSTI Certified – The Source Evaluation Society (SES) has developed the Qualified Source Testing Individual (QSTI) program to ensure that stack testing companies can demonstrate knowledge and the ability to apply source testing methods as well as fundamental engineering and chemistry principles in a consistent and professional manner.
  2. ISO Compliant (QA Program) – Compliance with the Source Emission Testing Quality Assurance Program helps ensure the validity of the data generated in the course of operations.
  3. NELAC Accredited – Accreditation with the National Environmental Laboratory Accreditation (NELAC) Institute (TNI) ensures that the stack testing company meets the national standard for generating environmental data.
  4. Experience in Your Industry – Check the references and background of a stack testing company to be sure that they have experience in your specific industry and equipment can ensure a more timely and cost effective result as their testing and reporting process will likely be more streamlined.
  5. A Record of Success – Researching how long the stack testing company has been in operation builds confidence that you can rely on them as your go-to source emission testing partner.
  6. Familiarity with Your State Regulations – Specific State regulations in the field of environmental air quality are different from one state to the next and are subject to change at any time.  Make sure that your stack testing company is up-to-date on the current regulations for your particular State.
  7. Cost Competitive Pricing – Compare the quotes from different stack testing companies not only on pricing, but also the comprehensive methods of analysis and data acquisition.  Cost is an important consideration, but before you go with the lowest bidder review the proposals to make sure that the low cost does not mean that you sacrifice quality of service.
  8. Safety Record – Safety is an issue and responsibility for both the stack testing company and the client themselves.  Check the safety record of the company you’re researching so you can be confident in the quality and safety of your operation.
  9. Rapid Mobilizations – How accessible is your stack testing company?  Make sure they can get to your site as quickly as possible when needed.
  10. Turn-around time on Results – Look for safe and reliable on-site labs and mobile data analysis to be sure that you’re getting the best turnaround time on your air testing results.
  11. Clear, Concise, Correct Reporting – Accurate and reliable test reports are crucial, so you can understand, evaluate, and process the data results in a manner relevant to your particular company and industry.
  12. Familiarity with EPA Electronic Reporting – Electronic reporting that can be uploaded, downloaded, and updated is more than a convenience in this era of air quality compliance.  Your business depends on the data contained in these reports and accessing it in an electronic format is critical to your business operations.

As you can see, there are many elements involved in choosing the right stack testing company for your needs.  We’ve highlighted some of the most important factors that you want to consider in your research.  These factors affect the success of your business, the safety and reliability of your operation, and the health of our environment.  Stack testing may be a requirement, but the quality of service and the results you receive are factors well within your control.

Please contact the experts at Environmental Source Samplers (ESS) to learn more about our stack testing services:

Phone: 910-799-1055
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.ESSKnowsAir.com

Ways to Prepare for your Upcoming Stack Test

Stack Testing ServicesSource Emissions testing, or stack testing, is mandated by the Clean Air Act of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which sets forth guidelines and requirements that must be met to determine a facility’s compliance with emission limits.  Any and all plants, factories, and facilities that utilize a stack as part of manufacturing or production operations are required to undergo stack testing in order to demonstrate compliance with current EPA standards.  There is more to stack testing than simple compliance, however.  A properly-executed testing plan gives you the diagnostic tools to help optimize your operations and improve energy efficiency — quality incentives for voluntary stack testing that is not simply driven by EPA requirements.  With careful preparation for stack-testing compliance and the proper execution of the test plan, a company can save money, protect workers, and effectively streamline their operations.

As a company prepares their facility for an upcoming stack test, reviewing the state-approved test plan is the best way to ensure that you understand all of the testing requirements.  Doing so is your greatest insurance that the stack testing results will show proper compliance with all relevant EPA air emission standards.  However, in many cases technical or legal jargon may make a portion or the entirety of the test plan difficult to understand, and it may not contain all of the required information necessary to conduct a successful test.  To assist you with this, we have put together the following Stack Testing Preparation Checklist to help you make sure that your company is properly prepared for your upcoming testing.  All items on this checklist should be reviewed with your qualified stack-testing team.

  1. What Load you will test at – This information is typically in your air permit
  2. What Fuel you will burn – Different fuel types can have vastly different emission limits
  3. OSHA compliant platforms – How will the stack test team reach the sampling plane?
  4. Power Requirements – Do you have enough circuits?
  5. Safety/Insurance Concerns- What are your facility requirements?  Does your stack test company meet these requirements?
  6. Are your test ports free from blockage and EPA Method 1 Compliant?
  7. What process data are you required to document, and how will that data be logged?

This checklist is compiled by an experienced stack testing company familiar with the pitfalls a company can experience when faced with an upcoming test.  Advance preparation, with these guidelines in mind, will provide your company the ability to address any issues or questions prior to the stack testing date, saving the time, hassle, and money that late revisions and changes inevitably cause.  These guidelines are also helpful in maintaining high levels of safety and compliance regardless of a scheduled stack test, benefitting overall operations and their environmental impact.

Choosing a stack testing company that has the appropriate background and experience for your industry will help ensure that your stack test will be successful.  The stack testing company should have the capability to execute the testing types and methodologies that govern your specific operations, and they should be using equipment that is well-maintained and up-to-date.  Just as importantly, they should be current and informed on the changes and revisions to existing testing methodologies, since the EPA air emission limits and standards are subject to change as the Agency sees fit.

Stack testing is required and performed for the health and safety of the plant, the workers, and the environment.   It is also a diagnostic tool that provides insight into the efficiency of your operations.  But whether you test for compliance or diagnostic purposes, careful preparation is the key to ensuring that your stack testing project gives you data that you can use effectively.

Please contact the experts at Environmental Source Samplers (ESS) to learn more about their stack testing services:

Phone: 910-799-1055
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.ESSKnowsAir.com

Bitnami